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Aims of Nursing Library

The aim of the library is to host and make accessible a range of information related to (in)continence nursing research, education, and practices for the ICS nursing membership.

Information for the purpose of the nursing library is defined as web links to policy documents, clinical pathways, research abstracts/papers, educational tools and any other document deemed useful to share knowledge with the nursing membership. The nursing membership does not own or control the content within each web link.

Information for the library:

  • Is thought to be informative, interesting, and useful to continence nurses
  • Must not be unlawful, harmful, threatening, abusive or otherwise objectionable
  • Must have the right to be made available. The originators of the information will have checked and confirmed in writing that the information is suitable for sharing
  • Must not infringe any patent, trademark, trade secret, copyright or other rights of any party
  • Represents accurate and current information/advice
  • Must not make available unsolicited or unauthorised advertising
  • Must not contain software viruses etc.
  • Must not contain any patient identifiable information or personal data about other users.

Should you wish to contribute information for the library, please contact the ICS Office: Jenny@ics.org

We hope that nurse members will enjoy this repository of information and that it will grow to meet part of our learning needs for the benefit of our patients, carers and families.

Information

  • American Nurses Association (ANA) CAUTI Prevention Tool
    Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI) are the most commonly reported hospital-acquired condition, and the rates continue to rise. The ANA offers innovative, streamlined, evidenced-based clinical tools developed by leading experts.
    Please click here to assess the website: http://nursingworld.org/ANA-CAUTI-Prevention-Tool

  • Alzheimer's disease/dementia: informal caregivers suite of resources These are resources for clinicians (nurses, MDs etc.) to provide to and discuss with informal caregivers of family member/friends who have Alzheimer's disease/dementia and who may have or are at risk for developing incontinence. They are evidenced-based, developed under a grant funded by NINR, NIH, in which caregivers and clinicians were interviewed or participated in focus groups about their health literacy needs related to incontinence. The topics and their content were developed in response to the results.
    Bliss, D.Z., Rolnick, C., Jackson, J., Arntson, C., Mullins, B.A, Hepburn, K. (2013) Health literacy needs related to incontinence and skin damage among family and friend caregivers of individuals with dementia. Journal of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nursing, 40, 515-523.
    Rolnick, S.J., Bliss, D.Z., Jackson, J.M. (2013) Healthcare providers’ perspectives for promoting communication with family caregivers and patients with dementia about incontinence and skin damage. Ostomy Wound Management, 59(4), 62–67.

Resources
• Guide to Disposable Absorbent Products
• Managing Incontinence in Person with Dementia: Diet and Fluid Adjustments
• Definitions of Common Terms Related to Bowel and Bladder Leakage and Associated Skin Damage (written in lay terms - intended for patients and caregivers)
• Guide to Over-the-Counter (OTC) Skin Cleansers and Protectants
• Incontinence and Skin questionnaire
• Managing Incontinence in Persons with Dementia
• Nursing Home Care for Residents with Incontinence: Questions to Ask
• The Relationship Between Incontinence and Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia
• Redness and Incontinence Associated Dermatitis
• Skin Damage from Incontinence
• For Caregivers: Taking Care of Yourself
• Talking to Your Loved One’s Health Care Provider about Incontinence
• Terms Used by Family/Friend Caregivers to Describe Incontinence
Click here to view the tools

  • A survey of nursing advice on sterile or clean intermittent catheters for long term bladder management by intermittent catheterisation The key finding from this small scale survey (n=28) was there was considerable variability in nurses' advice to IC users about cleaning, reusing, storing and changing IC catheters. The cost of catheters emerged as a key factor, as did nurses' assessment of the IC user's risk for infection.
    Please click here to access the full survey report

  • A survey of nursing advice on sterile or clean urinary drainage bags for long-term indwelling urinary catheterisation Ostaszkiewicz J., Paterson, J. (2012). Nurses' advice regarding sterile or clean urinary drainage bags for individuals with a long-term indwelling urinary catheter: A pilot survey. Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing. 39(1):77-83 doi: 10.1097/WON.0b013e31823f2dbc Please click here to access the full survey report

  • Continence Tools for Residential Aged Care
    Deakin University, Australia have developed a set of standard continence screening, assessment and management tools for use by workers in residential aged care homes. The tools, which were developed in an earlier project by the University, provide a structured process to assist a range of workers in these homes, to conduct an individualised assessment of a resident's continence status and implement a management plan if required.

These evidence based continence tools and resources provide guidance for Residential Aged Care Staff for the assessment and management of incontinence in residential aged care.

Developed by researchers from the Schools of Nursing, Deakin University and funded under the National Continence Management Strategy.

Resources
• Continence Assessment Form and Care Plan
• Continence Review Form
• Continence Screening Form
• Monthly Bowel Chart
• Seven Day Bowel Chart
• Continence Management Flow Chart
• Three Day Bladder Chart
• Factsheet
• Continence Tools for Residential Aged Care: An Education Guide
• Continence Tools Power Point Presentation
• Continence Tools Power Point with Notes
Click here to view the tools

Resources for Continence Nurses to use with Patients having Indwelling or Intermittent Urinary Catheters

Mary H. Wilde, PhD, RN, a Professor from the University of Rochester, would like you to be able to use her educational materials she developed for her studies of self-management in people with long-term urinary catheters (indwelling and intermittent catheter studies). Please contact her to preview the materials and if you are interested you may receive a no cost contract for revision and/or use.

Indwelling Catheter Self-Management:

  • The 22 page educational booklet has content about how to maintain optimal and consistent levels of fluid intake, preventing accidental dislodgement and kinks/twists of the catheter, drainage bag care, decreasing leakage, sexual adjustments, living with a catheter, caffeine, and recognizing early signs of urinary tract infection and autonomic dysreflexia.
  • The 3-day urinary diary is for a record of fluid intake and urinary output and descriptions of urine color or characteristics. It is on legal size paper with large spaces for people with poor hand dexterity. Separate journal pages provide for reflections on what might be causing catheter problems, e.g., more activity than usual and less fluids.

Intermittent Catheter Self-Management:

This 24 page educational booklet contains information on how to balance fluids with activity, a preferred interval for catheterization, catheter supplies, positions for catheterizing, preventing painful catheterizations, decreasing leaking, sexual adjustments, social support, working with caregivers, caffeine, and recognizing early signs of urinary tract infection and autonomic dysreflexia.

The interactive urinary diary is available only for web-use, but codes will be supplied if you are interested in using it. It has several pages including places for: goals, intake and output including many details related to urine observations, journal pages, and several charts and tables displaying cumulative data. As many entries as desired may be stored and visualized, making this a record of a few days or over an extended period of time as the system allows.

These copyrighted materials were created at the University of Rochester, School of Nursing. A copyright license to the materials is available from the University of Rochester for use in research or as a clinical tool to improve health but not for commercial purposes. The license is based on the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License. License terms are available at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/legalcode. The licensee could then modify it to meet their evolving needs. The future versions may thus evolve significantly beyond the original product. For more information, please contact. Mary Wilde by email at: mary_wilde@urmc.rochester.edu (Note the underscore between first and last names.)

Several articles from the studies are listed below.

Indwelling Catheter Study:

Wilde, M. H., McDonald, M. V., Brasch, J., McMahon, J., Fairbanks, E., Shah, S., Tang, W., & Scheid, E., (2013) Long-term urinary catheter users self-care practices and problems. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22, 356-67. (available free through PubMed and through a click on link below).

Wilde, M. H., Zhang, F., Fairbanks, E., Shah, S., McDonald, M. V., & Brasch, J., (2013). Perceived value of a urinary catheter self-management program in the home. Home Healthcare Nurse, 31 (9), 465-473. (available free through PubMed and through a click on link below).

Wilde, M. H., McMahon, J. M., McDonald, M. J., Tang, W., Wang, W., Brasch, J., Fairbanks, E., Shah, S., Zhang, F., & Chen, D. (2015) Self-management intervention for long-term indwelling urinary catheter users: Randomized clinical trial. Nursing Research, 64 (1), 24-34. DOI: DOI: 10.1097/NNR.0000000000000071. (available free through PubMed and through a click on link below).

Wilde, M. H., McMahon, J. M., Tang, W., McDonald, M. J., Brasch, J., Fairbanks, E., Shah, S. (Feb. 2015 e-published ahead). Self-care management questionnaire for long-term indwelling urinary catheter users. Neurourology and Urodynamics. DOI 10.1002/nau.22735

Wilde, M.H., Crean, H.F., McMahon, J.M., McDonald, M.V., Tang, W., Brasch, J., Fairbanks, E., Shah, S. & Zhang, F. (2016). Testing a model of self-management of fluid intake in community-residing long-term indwelling urinary catheter users. Nursing Research, 65, (2), pp. 97-106. doi: 10.1097/NNR.0000000000000140.

Wilde, M. H., Fairbanks, E., Parshall, R., Zhang, F., Miner, S., Thayer, D., Harrington, B., Brasch, J., Schneiderman, D., & McMahon, J. M. (2015). A Web-based self-management intervention for intermittent catheter users. Urologic Nursing, 35, 3, 127-133. DOI:10.7257/1053-816X.2015.35.3.127

Wilde, M. H., Fairbanks, E., Parshall, R., Zhang, F., Miner, S., Thayer, D., Harrington, B., Brasch, J., Schneiderman, D., & McMahon, J. M. (2015). A Web-based self-management intervention for intermittent catheter users. Urologic Nursing, 35, 3, 127-133. DOI:10.7257/1053-816X.2015.35.3.127 (available free through PubMed and through a click on link below)

Wilde, M. H., Fairbanks, E., Parshall, R., Zhang, F., Miner, S., Thayer, D., Harrington, B., Brasch, J., & McMahon, J. M. (2015). Development of an internet self-management intervention for intermittent urinary catheter users with spinal cord injury, CIN Computers, Informatics, and Nursing. 33 (11) 478-486. PMID: 26361267

Self-care Management Questionnaire for Long-term Indwelling Urinary Catheter Users. Mary H. Wilde, James M. McMahon, Wan Tang, Margaret V. McDonald, Judith Brasch, Eileen Fairbanks, and Shivani Shah. Neurourol Urodyn. 2016 April ; 35(4): 492–496. doi:10.1002/nau.22735.

Please Click here for the articles which are available free at this time. Please note that journals will release articles for these studies which were funded by the U.S. National Institute of Research after the publisher’s one year exclusive rights period has passed. So check now and then as more articles listed above will be uploaded as available.

  • Qualitative Research Abstracts

At the 2015 ICS Nursing Committee meeting, it was discussed and agreed to develop an informational document about submitting qualitative research abstracts to the ICS Scientific Committee. Therefore, the purpose of the document is to provide guidance to promote understanding and submission of high quality qualitative research abstracts to the ICS Annual Scientific Meeting. However, the document does not replace the ICS Abstract Submission Rules, but aides the interpretation and application of the rules for qualitative research. We hope that by having it available in our nursing library, it will be a helpful guide.

Please Click here to download

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